East High School - Kansas City Missouri


"We Built & Defended This Nation"

Kansas City Missouri - East High History

In My Life

Kansas City Sears Catalog Plant 1925-1997 Implosion, June 1, 1997

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Every Time You Go Away

Ezra Pound - The Needle

Come, or the stellar tide will slip away.
Eastward avoid the hour of its decline,
Now! for the needle trembles in my soul!
Here we have had our vantage, the good hour.
Here we have had our day, your day and mine.
Come now, before this power
That bears us up, shall turn against the pole.

Mock not the flood of stars, the thing's to be.
O Love, come now, this land turns evil slowly.
The waves bore in, soon they bear away.

The treasure is ours, make we fast land with it.
Move we and take the tide, with its next favour,
Abide
Under some neutral force
Until this course turneth aside.





Faithfully







1920s



1930s




1940s




1950s




1960s


1970s


1980s


1990s




From the 1963 Eastonian - Page 8

Old and new, this indeed has been the theme of us at East High School for many years. The experienced, the intermediate, and the novice all help to make up a school of great tradition.

Completely unfamiliar with our school, the eight graders (subfreshman) compose a new element at East. As we watch them learning how to manage their class schedules and other school affairs, we see a group that is slowly becoming acquainted with the ways of high school life.

As our students progress, they move into the intermediate grades of sophomore and junior. Advancing in years as well as knowledge, these pupils have nearly mastered the customs of our school. They make up the classes that have padded the threshold of beginning years and have moved into the upper half of the school.

After four years of growth and development, our students become seniors. Giving their various talents to our school, the seniors make up the experienced class at East High. In their last year at our school, these students must prepare to leave their responsible positions to others.

Thus, we students mature at East, from new to old. Our school, throughout the years, has tried to develop a group of steady, well-educated young people. Without a doubt, the theme of old and new most nearly describes life at East.

On October 23, 1923, the (Kansas City, Missouri) Board of Education adopted a resolution to accept a tract of land on Van Brunt Boulevard on which to build East High School. With this decision, work on our building moved along rapidly, and in 1926 the new school first opened its doors.

During the first few years of the school's existence, East was primarily an agricultural and horticultural high school. Influenced by this program, our early athletic teams were known as the "Aggies," the "Ducks," and the "Gazooks." Despite the fact that our teams had little experience, they put forth a great effort, in 1929 our varsity basketball team soared into a state (Missouri) championship.

Soon after East High School admitted its first classes, the situation arose where it was necessary to build more class space. In these first days, our auditorium was also used as a gymnasium. Because of crowding caused by the gym equipment, dances and other school activities, were held in the front hall. Not until the additions of a north and south wing and a separate art building did East High have an adequate library, cafeteria, gymnasium, swimming pool, auditorium, and art room.

Many activities were held in the spring and, high-lighting them all, was the balloting for the R.O.T.C. queen---the sponsor major. East's cadets played a much more important part in school life in those days. Walking proudly through our halls, members of the R.O.T.C. dressed in bell-bottomed trousers, knee length boots, and sported shining steel sabres. The school band, then a part of the cadet corps, added color to the activities of the year.

Without a doubt, the history of East High School may be looked back upon with pride. Today, although our rooms have been remodeled and enlarged, they still appear basically the same as they did in 1926. The great traditions established by our first classes are still carried on by the students of 1963.



From the 1965 Eastonian - Page 10

To the Student Body, East High School

Dear Students:

Did you know that the site on which East High School is located was originally set aside for a hospital? Mr. R. A. Long, wealthy lumberman, estimated the value of this property at $125,000.00. When it became evident that the people of the school district wanted this to be the location for a new school, Mr. Long made an agreement on October 23, 1923, by which he sold 16 acres to the school district for $75,000.00 and 18 acres were presented as a gift.

Forty years ago the cornerstone was laid for East High School. The laying of this stone, in 1925, represented a great victory and an event to be long remembered by those who had waged a vigorous battle to get a high school for this part of town.

The first students entered East on September 8, 1926. The first Eastonian, from which the foregoing was gleaned, came off the press in 1927. Mr. Clifford H. Nowlin, first principal of East, once told me that the student body numbered some 775 and that there were 36 faculty members.

Over the years East has grown to be one of the largest schools in the area. Several additions have been made to the original building. Our enrollment is now 1965 - quite appropriate since 1965 also represents the fourth decade for our fine building.

East's influence has been felt in many places. Thousands of persons in our community, and over our country, hold diplomas from East. As we meet them here and there, the graduates proudly refer to "dear East High".

East has won her share of honors and has contributed many leaders to this community. Her graduates hold responsible positions of leadership in community activities, church life, industry, and education in Kansas City.

It is our hope that this brief look into the years gone by will help each of us to realize the great heritage which is ours. We have the responsibility to carry onward and upward the fine spirit, enthusiasm, and dedication which has been typical of East since she first rose on the skyline of Kansas City.

We have every right to be proud of our past. What will people say about us as they look back upon our record forty years from now?

Sincerely, L. Clayton Dickson, Principal


"Within these Walls, Citizens are Molded, Memories are Born"

The First Cut Is The Deepest
If I Could Turn Back Time
Tears In Heaven


Money And School Performance: Lessons from the Kansas City Desegregation Experiment

July of 1997 The School Board Decision

Kansas City looks to cut funds as desegregation funds are phased out

The Kansas City, Mo., school district is proposing closing three schools and discarding many magnet themes in an effort to cut spending in preparation for the loss of funds for desegregation.

The district has been under court order to desegregate its schools since 1985, costing the state of Missouri and Kansas City taxpayers a total of $1.8 million.

In March U.S. District Judge Russell G. Clark ruled that the district's efforts had fallen far short of the mark, citing shortcomings in integrated education, staff development and school safety, as well as problems including administration turnover and chaotic budgeting.

Clark agreed to a $321 million settlement, but said court oversight must continue, according to Dr. Henry Williams, Kansas City superintendent. The $321 million will be distributed over the next four years.

Williams sees the ruling as a positive one because the district eventually will be free of court intervention, but it will be a challenge to operate without the desegregation subsidy.

"It will have a tremendous effect on how we operate," he says.

The loss of desegregation funding means the district must cut $55 million from its budget over the next three years, Williams says.

In July the board of education voted to cut $20 to $25 million by closing East and Southwest high schools and Bingham Middle School, and eliminating many court-ordered magnet themes. These include communications and writing, math and science, classical Greek, elementary and middle school computers and high school business and agribusiness.

In addition, the Metropolitan Advanced Technical High School will be restructured for use as a district administrative and technical center.

On Aug. 15 the plan will be submitted for the federal court's approval.

Passage of the proposal has not been without controversy in Kansas City, however.

School board member John Still, whose district includes Southwest High School, believes politics played a part in the selection of schools to be closed.

"I believe most of the school closings are based on political reasons," he says. "They picked schools to close where they perceived there would be the least resistance."

The proposal is "fiscally irresponsible," according to Still, since both Southwest and East high schools have been renovated in recent years and have state of the art facilities, while some of the schools slated to remain open need extensive renovation.

Still is also concerned about the emphasis on returning to neighborhood schools. "When we do that we would go back to segregated schools."

"[The proposal] is not the best thing for the district. It's not the way the district should be going," he says. "I think there are lots of things we haven't looked at. ... There are other things that could be done."

Still says there are a variety of other ways to cut the budget, such as reconfiguration.

Superintendent Williams says the plan would most likely change the makeup of some schools, but the district remains under court order to maintain the progress it has already made toward desegregation.

"We'll just have to wait and see what happens," he says. "The intent and purpose here is not to resegregate the district."

When Judge Clark ruled on the settlement, he also recommended that Missouri Commissioner of Education Robert E. Bartman or a special master be put in charge of the district's affairs.

Bartman declined, but recommended three other people to take charge of district affairs, according to Superintendent Williams. Judge Dean Whipple, who has taken over the case from Judge Clark, will rule on whether the district will have a team of special masters or one special master.

Undoubtedly, the next few years will bring many challenges for the Kansas City School District as it seeks to reorganize and cut spending, while maintaining the progress it has made to desegregate its schools.

Editor's note: Some information for this story was gathered from articles in the Kansas City Star and Education Week .

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From the Past

From: JEROME WINEGAR (Central) 1955

I was a teacher at East from 1959 to 1968. Taught English (1963-1968) and Common Learnings (1959-1963). Also coached football from 1959-1965 and track from 1960-1970. Remember the great mile relay team in 1965 ? The late Warren Jackman, Robert Kelley, Steve Halstead, and John Tellis. Their best time of 3:18.3 would still win most state championships anywhere in the US 35 years later!!!

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From the 1965 Eastonian - Page 235

Posting Second Fastest Time in the Nation, East High's mile relay team consistently stood-out with winning times throughout the track season. Their best time was 3:18:3. Left to Right: Steve Halstead, Robert (Bob) Kelley, Coach Roy Brown, Warren Jackman, and John Tellis.


Da Doo Ron Ron



Fastest time in Missouri EVER, Saturday, May 22, 1965,
Mid-West Federation at Shawnee-Mission Stadium.

MOOD Missouri's Officer Down Page

Jackman, Warren, Gene, 61W/3, Kansas City Police Department, 03/10/1976
Warren Jackman was later a Kansas City Missouri Policeman who was killed in 1976.




Chevrolet Leeds Plant closes in 1998

Description:

Kansas City Star article (Nov. 28, 1915) indicates that construction of the plant was to begin the winter of 1915-1916, but it wasn't until May 1928 that actual building began in Leeds. Operations began late in 1928. The plant closed in 1998.

Ford Winchester Plant moves to Claycomo

Description:

Article about the transfer of the local car assembly site in 1957, away from "the world's oldest branch assembly plant," in operations since 1912 - 1957 in Kansas City on Winchester Avenue (and 12th Street).


Great Seal, symbol used by the state to authenticate certain documents. Adopted on January 11, 1822.

The Great Seal was designed by Judge Robert William Wells and adopted by the Missouri General Assembly on January 11, 1822. The center of the state seal is composed of two parts. On the right is the United States coat-of-arms containing the bald eagle. In its claws are arrows and olive branches, signifying that the power of war and peace lies with the U.S. federal government. On the left side of the shield, the state side, are a grizzly bear and a silver crescent moon. The crescent symbolizes Missouri at the time of the state seal's creation, a state of small population and wealth which would increase like the new or crescent moon; it also symbolizes the "second son," meaning Missouri was the second state formed out of the Louisiana Territory.

This shield is encircled by a belt inscribed with the motto, "United we stand, divided we fall," which indicates Missouri's advantage as a member of the United States. The two grizzlies on either side of the shield symbolize the state's strength and its citizens' bravery. The bears stand atop a scroll bearing the state motto, "Salus Populi Suprema Lex Esto," which means, "Let the welfare of the people be the supreme law." Below this scroll are the Roman numerals for 1820, the year Missouri began its functions as a state.

The helmet above the shield represents state sovereignty, and the large star atop the helmet surrounded by 23 smaller stars signified Missouri's status as the 24th state. The cloud around the large star indicates the problems Missouri had in becoming a state. The whole state seal is enclosed by a scroll bearing the words, "The Great Seal of the State of Missouri."



Contents



What's NEW

EAST HISTORY

The COMMITTEE

REUNION INFORMATION

PHOTO's PAGE

FACULTY / STAFF

PUBLICATIONS

EVENTS

LITERARY SOCIETIES

ORGANIZATIONS

ATHLETICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS








Number of East Bears Attending the 2009 Multi-Year Reunion

GRAND TOTAL
601
as of September 19, 2009



Faculty

17



1927

?

1928

?

1929

?

Total
Faculty
17

1930

?

1931

?

1932

?

1933

?

1934

?

1935

?

1936

?

1937

?

1938

?

1939

?

Total
- 30s -
0

1940

?

1941

?

1942

?

1943

?

1944

?

1945

?

1946

?

1947

?

1948

?

1949

1

Total
- 40s -
1

1950

?

1951

5

1952

4

1953

3

1954

7

1955

8

1956

7

1957

13

1958

21

1959

39

Total
- 50s -
107

1960

52

1961

45

1962

48

1963

26

1964

30

1965

34

1966

33

1967

29

1968

12

1969

30

Total
- 60s -
339

1970

14

1971

48

1972

12

1973

8

1974

19

1975

5

1976

11

1977

12

1978

2

1979

?

Total
- 70s -
131

1980

?

1981

1

1982

?

1983

?

1984

2

1985

?

1986

?

1987

?

1988

?

1989

2

Total
- 80s -
5

1990

1

1991

?

1992

?

1993

?

1994

?

1995

?

1996

?

1997

?

1998

?

1999
closed

Total
- 90s -
1

2000
closed

2001
closed

2002
closed

2003
closed

2004
closed

2005
closed

2006
closed

2007
closed

2008

?

2009

?

Total
- 00s -
0




2009 MULTI YEAR REUNION
SAVE THE DATE
Mark your calendar for
Saturday, September 26, 2009
Ararat Shrine Temple
5100 Ararat Drive
Kansas City, Missouri 64129
6:00 PM till 12 Midnight
More Info To Follow